Laura Anderson Book Talk Recap: 11/19/13

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Tuesday night the WLC was fortunate to have debut novelist Laura Andersen, author of the The Boleyn Trilogy, speak to a rapt audience of 25 at the library.

Ms. Andersen has written an ingenious series which hinge on her envisioning Tudor history rewritten as Anne Boleyn’s having given birth to a male heir, dramatically  changing the course of history.

Laura led us into the “behind the scenes” life of a writer in a way that helped make understandable what is involved in creating stories that are based on historical periods that give rise to major religious and social change.

She explained how she was prompted by her muse, and her agent, who saw in this uniquely reimagined series a very strong market.

In her charming talk she cited libraries she frequented as a child as places where she became aware of her life long love of books and writing.

To that end she donated $200. to the WLC which she has added to her list of places she loves. We love that ,too!

All told we gained $310. that night, from Laura’s generosity, book sales, and donations. While not our most lucrative evening, the WLC is committed to being a champion of literature, up and coming young writers, and the importance of libraries as forums for their work.

 

The following volunteers made it happen: Ann Snow, Rebecca McGrath, Deborah Coppa, Linda Crowe, Kathryn Doran, Sloane Awtrey, Joanna Connolly, Alice Jacobs, Harriet Kahn, and Denise Wernikoff.

 

To read any of her books please come to the library to check them out, we purchased both. Keep your eyes open for Laura’s exciting and inventive books!

 

 

 

 

Dear Lover of Books,

For so many years, you have been little more than the hope of my heart and a wistful dream of my imagination. It’s been nine years since I began writing the single novel that eventually became The Boleyn King, The Boleyn Deceit, and The Boleyn Reckoning. When I started in 2004, I could count my readership on two hands. Now, there are more readers—strangers, most of you—who have generously taken a chance on a debut author and gone out of your way to connect with me. How to explain the joy of knowing that characters I love and a story I have lived with for almost a decade are now becoming part of others’ experience? I write the stories I want to read; how lucky for me that others want to join the alternate world of Anne Boleyn’s royal son as well.

Thank you for reading—not only my books, but any and all books. I’ve been a writer for a dozen years or so, but I’ve been a reader since I was four years old. Like you, I revel in the words and worlds of authors and every day I give thanks for a life in which I’m allowed to contribute to that culture.

May all your books bring you joy!

Laura Andersen

Learn more on Laura’s website and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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In Memoriam, Elmore Leonard

In Memoriam, Elmore Leonard

A great man of American letters, Elmore Leonard, died yesterday, August 19, 2013, at eighty seven. Author of over forty volumes from Westerns to his unique brand of crime novels, Elmore Leonard was totally at home anywhere his pen took him. He created a unique style of crime novel based on vivid personalities built through perfectly captured vernacular.

His home town Detroit, Miami, Hollywood – we came to know them and live there for a while through his piercing and very humorous lens. “Get Shorty,” “Gold Coast,” “Out of Sight,” and many, many others came from the mind of this American original. More than a few were made into films.

You can find several of his books at the Waban Library Center, and if we don’t have them, we will order them.

Alice Jacobs

George’s 95th Birthday Party!

WLC volunteers celebrate the birthday of one of our loyal volunteers, George Rivetz.  We hope George doesn’t mind that we reveal that he is 95 years young this month and going strong (even if he claims to be a Yankees fan). Stop by and say hello to George at the WLC and listen to some of his stories about his many years with the Postal Service and working for the Red Sox when tickets cost 40 cents.  Happy Birthday to George from all of us at the WLC and here’s to many more!

WLC volunteers celebrate the birthday of one of our loyal volunteers, George Rivetz.  We hope George doesn’t mind that we reveal that he is 95 years young this month and going strong (even if he claims to be a Yankees fan). Stop by and say hello to George at the WLC and listen to some of his stories about his many years with the Postal Service and working for the Red Sox when tickets cost 40 cents.  Happy Birthday to George from all of us at the WLC and here’s to many more!

WLC volunteers celebrate the birthday of one of our loyal volunteers, George Rivetz.  We hope George doesn’t mind that we reveal that he is 95 years young this month and going strong (even if he claims to be a Yankees fan). Stop by and say hello to George at the WLC and listen to some of his stories about his many years with the Postal Service and working for the Red Sox when tickets cost 40 cents.  Happy Birthday to George from all of us at the WLC and here’s to many more!

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The Odd Couple

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Sheldon Rothman (left) is one of the volunteers at the WLC.

 

The Odd Couple: A Conversation with Two of the PMC’s Most Chronologically Gifted Riders

By Lauren Gibbons Paul

By their own admission, they’re not exactly two peas in a pod. One is a staunch conservative, the other liberal as they come. One is 15 minutes early to any meeting; the other is chronically late. One is extroverted and will chat with anyone; the other is more reserved. One is laid back; the other attacks life in every possible way.

“We have different approaches,” says Brookline resident Alvin A. Krakow, 84, with characteristic restraint. On the other side of the table, 84-year-old Newton resident Sheldon Rothman puts in, “Al’s a nice guy so I don’t mind waiting for him.”

What the two octogenarian cycling partners do share – beyond a warm friendship — is a track record of nearly a decade of raising money and riding together in the PMC. Krakow, currently the oldest one-day rider, is a veteran of 15 one-day PMC rides. Rothman will ride the two-day for the 12th consecutive time this year, the oldest rider to do so, a distinction he cherishes and fights to maintain.

“No one else anywhere near my age wants to suffer through the two-day,” says Rothman, a retired business executive who got in on the ground floor at Reebok and had a notable career there. Among his plentiful volunteer gigs: Playing cards with the “old folks” a local nursing home (many of whom are younger than he).

Rothman plans to do the ride until he is 90, maybe beyond that. Good health has been his gift, though he has lots of friends and family who have battled cancer. He is doggedly passionate about raising money for cancer research. “We have to do something to stop this disease,” he says.

Krakow came to the PMC after finishing three cross-country bike rides that he did in order to see the countryside and its inhabitants up close. With many consecutive “century” (100-mile) days under his belt from those trips, Krakow did not feel he had anything to prove to anyone. The one-day PMC was just fine. And decades after founding a successful endodontics practice, he had a ready network from which to fundraise. He has personally raised roughly $125,000 for the PMC to date.

Krakow’s approach to training for the ride is the opposite of Rothman’s. In a word: Casual. A few rides with Rothman on the Vineyard in June and July. Beyond that, nothing. “People forever have asked me, how can you do it with the little training you do? I can’t explain it,” says Krakow.

Rothman, on the other hand, is an adrenaline junkie who trains hard all year taking three grueling spinning classes each week all winter and starting his outdoor rides as soon as the ice melts. He lives for the thrill of getting going when it is still dark out, before the slew of younger riders hit the road. A few years back, he had to pull out of the race after hitting the curb in the dark one morning and getting pretty banged up. Suffice to say, ride health workers made him quit, otherwise he would have kept going. “If you have a nice, easy, comfortable ride, it’s boring. I’m really not a calm, easy-going guy,” he acknowledges.

Krakow has taken the last few years off after being sidelined after a bout with colon cancer in 2010 and recovering from a hip fracture in 2012. This year, feeling stronger most days, he hopes to complete the one-day. And his faithful partner and friend will be there with him.

“That’s the difference between Sheldon and me,” says Krakow. “If his knee flares up he will not stop. If I have to stop, I will stop because it’s not about finishing this ride, for me. It’s about going out there, having fun, and raising money.”

For all their differences, they do have one thing in common, it would seem: the lack of a keen sense of direction. “The last two years that we rode, both years, we got lost,” says Rothman, both of them chuckling at the memory.

 

To sponsor Sheldon Rothman or Al Krakow, please visit PMC.org and enter their names on the “Donate” page.  To sponsor Sheldon Rothman or Al Krakow, please visit PMC.org and enter their names on the “Donate” page.

Dan Shaughnessy Talk and Book Signing Recap

PICTURE@Thursday night, April 18th, the Waban Library Center played host to Dan Shaughnessy, the home team’s award winning sports columnist, and author of “Francona: The Red Sox Years.” (The book has been on the NYT best seller list for over 3 months.)

Eighty two people filled the stands at the venerable library and Dan gave a home run performance. Fans made up the majority of the eager crowd, and peppered the author with many an intriguing baseball question. He had the answers! He also signed many of his,books, and joined everyone in a post-talk reception of delicious ball park refreshments. Everyone came out a winner!

The Waban Library Center offers many events throughout the year. Check out our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Waban-Library-Center/109583426871.

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David Ferry Poetry Reading Recap

National Book Awards 2012On Wednesday, March 20, David Ferry, renowned poet and translator, and our own, Marcia Karp, fellow poet and WLC volunteer, read from their poems and translations (from the Latin), to an enraptured audience of 37 people at the Waban Library Center. Ferry’s awards include: the 2012 National Book Award, the Library of Congress’s Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize and many others. He is Professor Emeritus of English at Wellesley College, and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Suffolk University. Several copies of his 2012 volume of poems, “Bewilderment: New and Selected Poems and Translations,” were purchased. A copy was bought for the WLC, and will be available soon. The excellent acoustics of the library were a fitting stage for the resonant, often dramatic reading of Ferry and Karp.  We were privileged to have our first Poetry Reading provided by world class poets such as these. Thanks to WLC Volunteers: Rebecca McGrath, Ann Snow, Linda Crowe, Alice Jacobs, Chrissy Parker, Lauren Paul and Louise Freedman, for helping make the evening flow.